Inland Passage 2016

June 12, 2016

The rain poured all night, but considering we had pitched our tent on a cement platform we stayed dry. There was not a place to put up a tarp, but Corey had offered the use of a work shed which we could use to cook breakfast and we happily took up the offer.

 We were told this was where the fish was kept.

We were told this was where the fish was kept.

 The work shed and soon to be our kitchen.

The work shed and soon to be our kitchen.

We were glad to see that our kayaks were still well secured at the dock and sitting above the water line after it had poured all night.

 Our waiting kayaks

Our waiting kayaks

As we were cooking our breakfast, the rain came down hard and we were able to smile as we watched it from inside a dry building. The pancakes tasted oh so good. Check out the glass gallon water jugs in the back. Someday they may be for sale as very pure bottled water.

 A much appreciated dry space.

A much appreciated dry space.

Corey came down to visit this morning and offered to take us on a tour. The buildings were in about the same conditions as Namu, the last abandoned cannery. The only exception might be that this place has had continuous caretakers and they have all left some signs of their occupation. Lots of history and artifacts in this place. We saw the building which is still making electricity for the buildings from water power. It was quite impressive knowing how long it has been working with very little repairs. While we were continuing to talk on the dock a BC ferry stopped outside of the buildings and one could hear a narrator telling about the history.

 BC Ferry

BC Ferry

The Alaskan State Ferry passes by here, but never stops. the owner of the property has bought a drone for Corey to take videos. We were quite impressed as he showed us his skills at maneuvering the drone.

 Corey, the caretaker

Corey, the caretaker

By 10 we are packed and ready to go, but first we check our emails as there is internet here. Don's father has improved slightly, but does not sound very good. The ability to communicate via the internet still has us somewhat baffled. As we head off we admire the large waterfall and also take note of the angry skies in the direction we we heading.

 Beautiful falls.

Beautiful falls.

 Looks like we are in for some rain!

Looks like we are in for some rain!

The day is filled with rain squalls and gusts of wind. Not many take outs along the shore. We are glad we have put on extra layers, it is a cold damp day! As the tide lowers it exposes several colorful animals that generally live below sea level.

 Purple starfish

Purple starfish

 Red Sea Urchin

Red Sea Urchin

The weather is not improving and the waves splash over our deck. If we saw a spot to camp we would probably stop, but there is not any along the coast. One of our books mentions a site that may have potential. In fact the author recalls it as being one of his favorites as it is surrounded by high mountains and waterfalls. As we round a point, a beach looks like his description. We check it out and think we can make it work. Our first impression is that it will be quite tight and most likely if we camp on the beach, we may have to move it momentarily when the tide comes up. I do a little more scouting and find a tent site about 10 feet up on a small ledge. Someone has been here before and we are going to take advantage of their creativity. We can put our kitchen up on beach logs and it should stay dry. Our tent just fits and we remind ourselves that any night activity must be done with caution. It has been a long two days and our bodies are tired. Sleep comes quickly.

Nautical Miles paddled 12.5