Inland Passage 2016

June 19, 2016

We listened to the weather forecast which was calling for wind to build by afternoon. There was going to be another large crossing to do either later today or early tomorrow. Generally we like to do crossings early, as that is when the wind is the least strong, but on this trip that does not always seem to be the case. So we look at all the factors and decide accordingly. It is an easier load this morning as the tide is higher, We paddle past a First Nations village that had been called Fort Simpson now it is known by its native name. The houses and buildings are well kept. It is early so we do not see any activity and pass by. This will be our last town in Canada. Next town will find us in Alaska.

 A quiet early morning paddle.

A quiet early morning paddle.

Once we leave the somewhat protected bay that this town is located. We head toward a site that may put us in a good position to cross Portland Canal which is part of the exposed part of the  Dixon Entrance. Camping sites are now harder to find so we thought that if could find this place we could stop and take a break and assess the crossing. the weather is overcast and the wind is starting to build.

 Last picture we take till we get across Portland canal and into calmer water.

Last picture we take till we get across Portland canal and into calmer water.

We have checked where the guidebook said that there was a camping spot. Unfortunately it did not match the map and when we had gone around an island to find it, we came out in a channel called Work Channel. The current was not in our favor, in fact the current was creating large standing waves as it rushed into the channel. We had hoped to avoid this, but our new plan was to hug the shore taking advantages of back eddies as we got towards the mouth of the channel.

At this point we put our kayaks into ferry mode and with a tight angle ferried to the other side. We were glad to have that done! Now we were looking straight at Portland canal. There was some wind but the current was flooding and that was a good sign to get us across. We steadily made forward progress. Waves would go over our decks, but with controlled bracing and a little adrenaline we kept moving. Once again we appreciate the strength of the current. We were headed to a sandy Island called Proctor Island. We had made good time so far this morning and we arrived at the island around 2. It was a great spot to take a break, but we decided to move on as the wind had calmed and we were feeling good.

 What a contrast from our previous camp.

What a contrast from our previous camp.

 It was temping to stay here.

It was temping to stay here.

 After a short nap we were ready to go.

After a short nap we were ready to go.

Our next point of potential hazard was Cape Fox. If we paddled somewhat further today we could see what the conditions were at the Cape.  So with that in mind we headed off to Tongass Island. This had been a site of a native village as well as a trade settlement. We did not see any signs of past civilization, but the forest is quite thick so did not want to go exploring. The day had turned sunny so we took the opportunity to dry out some of our gear.

 Nice shell beach

Nice shell beach

 Interesting to imagine lots of activity here at one time.

Interesting to imagine lots of activity here at one time.

We took a small walk along the beach and found a few berries and checked out the crossing to Cape Fox

Nautical Miles traveled 25